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Drive Fit Campaign blog: Approaching Someone with Concerns about Their Driving

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][mk_image src=”https://www.moveitorloseit.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/homepage-header.jpg” image_width=”800″ image_height=”350″ crop=”false” svg=”false” lightbox=”false” group=”_general” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” caption_location=”inside-image” align=”left” margin_bottom=”10″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][mk_padding_divider size=”40″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]It can be incredibly difficult to approach a friend or relative who’s driving ability you’re concerned about. But ignoring the signs of someone becoming more and more hesitant or dangerous behind the wheel could mean that you’re endangering their life, and the safety of others. Having a conversation about whether a loved one should consider giving up driving is never going to be easy, so we’ve put together a few pointers:

Check the law


Make sure you understand the changes in driving legislation, to help you talk about how driving, and the rules of the road, have changed since your friend or relative took their test.

Get your timing right


Don’t wait until something happens before you air your concerns about someone’s driving. Approaching them after a bump or a near miss will probably just make them feel defensive, which isn’t going to be productive. You should be proactive about the subject; casually mention it, discuss a related news story or talk about someone they know who’s recently stopped driving. Use unrelated examples wherever possible and mentally prepare a few of these in advance.

Empathise with them


You’re bringing this up with your friend/relative because you care about them, it’s important that they know that. It’ll help to tell them about how you’d feel if you couldn’t drive or lost some other ability which would affect your independence. Remember that it’s a life-changing event for people when they lose their ability to drive. The difference between popping out in the car to do the shopping and being back at home in 45 minutes, and doing the same thing via public transport, which could take twice as long and be much more stressful, is a tough adjustment for anyone to make.

Listen to what they have to say


Get your friend or loved-one talking, it’ll help to make them feel less like you’re criticising them. Ask whether they’ve found that their driving habits have changed in recent years? Ask what changes they’ve made to their driving to compensate? Are they a slower driver these days? Do they still drive at night? Do they find it tougher to concentrate with the radio on? Has the way other drivers on the road behave changed in recent years?

Suggest some alternatives to driving

Generally people feel that driving gives them a measure of freedom and independence that it’s difficult to appreciate until you contemplate no longer being able to drive. Public transport isn’t always a viable option, so are there any other arrangements which you could make to keep your friend/loved one mobile?[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][mk_icon_box icon=”mk-moon-car” title=”Click here to find out more about Drive Fit ” text_size=”16″ font_weight=”inherit” read_more_url=”http://www.rias.co.uk/drive-fit/” style=”simple_minimal” icon_size=”small” rounded_circle=”false” icon_location=”left” circled=”false” icon_color=”#005cb9″ icon_circle_color=”#005cb9″ box_blur=”false” margin=”30″][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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